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The aims of this study were to assess the knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors towards seasonal influenza and its vaccination among pregnant women. A cross-sectional survey was carried out among a sample of women in the second or third trimester of pregnancy in Italy. The 64.2% of the sample knew that the influenza is more dangerous for pregnant women. Women of older age, Italian, and who had a pregnancy at high-risk were more likely to have this knowledge. This knowledge was lower among women with none, primary or secondary school education. The majority of the respondents considered the vaccine not very useful during pregnancy. Those younger, unmarried, who knew that influenza is more dangerous for pregnant women, who knew that the vaccine could protect them, who reported a higher self-rated health status, and who had received information about influenza and its vaccination were more likely to have a positive attitude toward the usefulness of influenza vaccination in pregnancy. Women with secondary school education and with more than one child revealed a lower perception. Only 9.7% had received the vaccine and 21.4% of those unvaccinated would be willing to receive it. This positive attitude was higher among women with one child, who knew that the vaccine could protect them against the influenza, and who have a positive attitude toward the usefulness of the vaccination during pregnancy. Health educational programs are needed to improve the knowledge about seasonal influenza and vaccination rate in pregnancy.

Citation

Francesco Napolitano, Paola Napolitano, Italo Francesco Angelillo. Seasonal influenza vaccination in pregnant women: knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors in Italy. BMC infectious diseases. 2017 Jan 09;17(1):48

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PMID: 28068918

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